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FIRST PHILIPPINE HOLDINGS IS A CORPORATION THAT IS CONSTANTLY IN ACTION. WE’RE ALWAYS TRYING TO FIND WAYS TO DELIVER FOR OUR STAKEHOLDERS AND THE FILIPINO PEOPLE.

2017

Many of global warming’s adverse effects – such as sea level rise, an increase in sudden and extreme weather events, and major ecological changes – can already be observed. These occurrences also come with significant consequences for livelihood, national and global economies, water and food security, and health and the spread of disease. Because of these, it is imperative that the entire world work together to drastically cut down the planet’s greenhouse gas emissions before it’s too late. While most of the world has quite a way to go, some countries are already proving that a shift to 100 percent renewable energy is in fact, possible. Here are some of the countries who have already achieved the dream of completely clean energy, or are at least on their way.

COSTA RICA

This small country in South America is a big player in the field of renewable energy. According to the Costa Rican Electricity Institute, 98.12 percent of the country’s energy came from renewable sources in 2016 (led by hydroelectric plants), and for a total of more than 250 days, the country ran on nothing but clean energy. Although Costa Rica’s small population of less than five million demands much less energy, the country’s achievements serve as a benchmark and beacon of hope for the future of renewable energy.

SWEDEN

On target to run entirely on renewables by 2040, Sweden is putting its money where its mouth is. To promote heavier investment in renewables, the country will completely scrap taxes for solar energy production starting this year. Currently, Sweden’s energy mix is dominated by hydropower and nuclear power, but according to the Swedish energy market regulator, the country needs to achieve a five to ten percent increase in the share of solar electricity in order to achieve its ambitious renewable energy goals.

DENMARK

Denmark has been leading the way in terms of wind power, breaking its own world record by sourcing 42 percent of its electricity from wind turbines in 2015. Aside from generation, it is also the number one exporter of wind power equipment. However, recent developments have cast some doubt on whether the country will be able to hit its target of sourcing 50 percent of its energy from wind power by 2020. Because of high costs, the government will be scrapping its green energy subsidies and will also hold off on the construction of five planned offshore wind power farms.

GERMANY

Although Germany was recently unseated by China as the world’s solar power leader, the country was still at second place with a total PV installed capacity of 39,700 MW in 2015. This achievement is quite noteworthy, especially for a country with a relatively small land area (considering solar power traditionally requires more space) that doesn’t particularly get much sun. Moreover, the world’s fourth largest economy also reportedly hit a renewable energy output of 90 percent at one point in 2016, proving that renewables can in fact supply the energy demands of highly industrialized nations, provided issues of instability and intermittence are resolved.

MOROCCO

The most recent climate change conference host country is proving to be a ray of sunshine for renewable energy in the developing world, both literally and figuratively. Morocco has a 52 percent green energy target by 2030, and is building one of the world’s largest solar power plants with funds from the European Union, the first phase of which opened last year.