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FIRST PHILIPPINE HOLDINGS IS A CORPORATION THAT IS CONSTANTLY IN ACTION. WE’RE ALWAYS TRYING TO FIND WAYS TO DELIVER FOR OUR STAKEHOLDERS AND THE FILIPINO PEOPLE.

2016

December 30, 2016

Nowadays, we can’t live without electricity. We know it’s going to be there when we get home after a long day, when we switch on the lights, turn on the TV, or put the airconditioning on. All we need to do is press a button, turn a knob, or flick a switch, and numerous appliances and electronics come to life. But where does this power come from? What goes on beyond the socket on the wall? Most of us take electricity for granted. Understanding where exactly energy comes from, and the journey it takes to get to our homes, can help us become more responsible consumers.

The power production process can be divided into three phases or stages: generation, transmission and distribution.

There are many different types of energy sources, ranging from heavy-polluting fossil fuels to renewables like water, wind, and geothermal. The exact journey of electricity may vary depending on the source, but the quality of electricity produced is always the same.

Electricity production usually begins at a power station – built near the source – where generators are run by heat energy from combustion or by kinetic energy from flowing water or wind. The energy turns the turbine blades in a generator which then rotate an electromagnetic shaft connected to them. The rotation of this shaft then creates a current of electricity.

A transformer increases the voltage of the electricity so it can flow through transmission lines – either overhead or underground – and travel across great distances to reach different parts of the grid. These massive transmission towers and cables can often be seen in more rural areas, or in the outskirts of cities and provinces.

From these cables and towers, electricity continues to travel until it reaches neighborhood transformers which lower the voltage. Before electricity is distributed into your home, transformers on the electric posts right outside your house convert it to an even lower voltage, which can then be used to power your lights, electronics and appliances.